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The Spa on Green Street was once home to this prominent Gainesville resident
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The historic Dunlap-Burroughs House on Green Street in Gainesville is home to The Spa on Green Street. - photo by Scott Rogers
Dunlap-Burroughs House

This story is part of a series on historic homes on Gainesville's Green Street. Read other stories in the series. Copies of a free publication on Green Street home history are available at The Times at 345 Green St.

Address: 635 Green St.

Built: 1912

Architecture: Georgian

Situated on the corner of Green Street and Ridgewood Avenue, the Dunlap-Burroughs House was built in 1912 by Samuel C. Dunlap for his son, Samuel C. Dunlap Jr., using timber cut from the ancestral Thompson Place farm, according to the historic preservation division of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources.

A lawyer, railway official and banker, the senior Dunlap was described by Lucian Lamar Knight in the fifth volume of his book, “A Standard History of Georgia and Georgians,” as “a man of wealth and influence” whose life showed “no inconsistency between the accumulation of a fortune and a broad and generous public spirit and service on behalf of his community.”

Born in Gwinnett County, Dunlap enlisted in Company I of the Sixteenth Georgia Calvary at the age of 16, serving as a Confederate soldier until the end of the war. He returned to the books after his service, according to Knight, attending high school in Lawrenceville and teaching for one year at Corinth in Hall County in 1868 while also studying law. He was admitted to the bar in 1869 and established his office in Walton County before coming to Gainesville in 1872.

According to his March 1920 obituary, Dunlap was “one of the most prominent and widely known citizens” of Gainesville who played an instrumental role in “furthering the growth and interests of the city in many ways.” In addition to presiding over the Gainesville National Bank, Dunlap was appointed by President Grover Cleveland to serve as a United States Marshal for Georgia’s northern district, which he did over a four-year term. From there, he went on to work as a receiver for the old Gainesville, Jefferson and Southern railroad — later the Gainesville Midland — for five years.

According to the historic preservation division of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Pearl T. Adams purchased the home in 1917 and completed the upstairs; some time after, Dunlap bought it back and when he died, Corrine Riley Burroughs bought the home. In 1974, Samuel Riley Dunlap owned the home.

Boasting its original fireplaces and interior pocket doors, the house now belongs to The Spa on Green Street where, according to spa attendant Kris Ramsey, Dunlap allegedly makes occasional appearances in shadows and tangible sensations in certain rooms. Ramsey noted that a closed tunnel runs beneath the Dunlap-Burroughs House to the Dixon-Rudolph House across the street, perhaps a relic from the Prohibition era, from staff’s best guess.

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The Dunlap-Burroughs house at 635 Green St. in Gainesville is a two-story frame neoclassical design built in 1912 for Col. Samuel C. Dunlap. Today it is home to The Spa on Green Street. - photo by Scott Rogers
GREENdunlap 3.jpg
The Dunlap-Burroughs house at 635 Green St. in Gainesville is a two-story frame neoclassical design built in 1912 for Col. Samuel C. Dunlap. Today it is home to The Spa on Green Street. - photo by Scott Rogers
GREENdunlap 4.jpg
The Dunlap-Burroughs house at 635 Green St. in Gainesville is a two-story frame neoclassical design built in 1912 for Col. Samuel C. Dunlap. Today it is home to The Spa on Green Street. - photo by Scott Rogers
GREENdunlap 5.jpg
The Dunlap-Burroughs house at 635 Green St. in Gainesville is a two-story frame neoclassical design built in 1912 for Col. Samuel C. Dunlap. Today it is home to The Spa on Green Street. - photo by Scott Rogers
GREENdunlap 6.jpg
The Dunlap-Burroughs house at 635 Green St. in Gainesville is a two-story frame neoclassical design built in 1912 for Col. Samuel C. Dunlap. Today it is home to The Spa on Green Street. - photo by Scott Rogers
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