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New records system to offer more details, faster on crime statistics
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Ryan Daly, a hit-and-run investigator with the Hall County Sheriff's Office, showcases his body camera on Tuesday, March 5, 2019. - photo by Austin Steele

Renters and real estate agents will soon be armed with more information when making housing decisions once the Hall County Sheriff’s Office finishes a feature for its website.

Capt. Sean McCusker said the department was working on building out a module that would allow residents to learn more about crime statistics in an area.

“A lot of Realtors ... they’ll call up and say, ‘What’s the crime for this subdivision?’ I would have to run a report, and it’d take me two or three hours to run it,” Lt. Stephanie Gilbert said.

McCusker said the module would likely be finished by the end of March, though the date was tentative.

The Sheriff’s Office is now a few months into its new records management system, which split from the Hall County Comprehensive Justice Information System.

CJIS, which linked jail and arrest information to the Hall County court system, was first implemented in the 1980s.

The Sheriff’s Office is now using Superion’s ONESolution Records Management System, Jail Management System and Mobile Field Reporting.

A recent open records request for violent gun crime took Gilbert more than a day to count and sort. 

With a move to a different reporting system, Gilbert’s counterparts were finished in five minutes pulling more recent data.

Expanded categories in the new reporting system meant less sorting through old records.

Since the initial rollout, there have been two updates to the records management system from the vendor. 

Gilbert said the Sheriff’s Office is in a three-month test phase of moving to incident-based reporting as compared to uniform crime reporting.

Much of what the FBI gathered for its previous crime analysis studies was uniform crime reporting, which only lists eight offense categories such as murder, rape and aggravated assault.

“We should be knowing probably this month if we’re ready to go straight to (incident-based reporting), but the whole state has to go by January of 2021,” Gilbert said.

Incident-based reporting will allow for more categories to be subdivided when investigating crime. For example, uniform crime reporting only allows for an “assault” report, while incident-based reporting lists different victim types such as police or spouses.

“The FBI wanted everybody to move to IBR where we’re all capturing the same information and we’re reporting the same information,” Gilbert said.

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Ryan Daly, a hit-and-run investigator with the Hall County Sheriff's Office, wears his body camera on Tuesday, March 5, 2019. - photo by Austin Steele
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