By allowing ads to appear on this site, you support the local businesses who, in turn, support great journalism.
Suggestion to parents: Prepare kids for job market
Placeholder Image

To send a letter to the editor, click here for a form and letters policy or send to letters@
gainesvilletimes.com

I wanted to shed some light on something very tragic that needs to be addressed, not just by the institutions, but by the parents of students as well. I recently began helping a friend find a job here locally.

Usually this is something simple for an incoming junior classmen, but this situation was fairly unique. The student, who shall remain nameless, is not from this area and has extremely limited professional contacts. What was even more shocking is that she also did not have a resumé, or even know how to produce one.

Now while this may seem trivial to some, it is not only the duty of educational institutions to prepare students for fields of study to integrate into the outside world, but also to prepare them for seeking employment in the outside world. Otherwise, why in the world do you spend on average $35,000, on top of grants, just to receive a piece of paper that really does nothing for you if you are not prepared for how to use that piece of paper?

The school is local and I pass no blame on the instructors because their curriculum is mandated, but it is truly a shame that a college in today’s times does not begin preparing students, regardless of major, on the necessity of gaining valuable work experience, or how to even obtain it.

So parents, listen up. I do not care if you make a six-figure salary 10 times over, and you want your precious son or daughter to just go to school and enjoy their free time. You are doing irreparable harm to their professional skills, both socially and scholastically. I will be honest, some jobs are absolutely terrible, but those are jobs, not careers. You should no longer assume that the institutions you are stroking checks to for books, other fees, et cetera are taking their precious time to teach your children about the most important aspect of today, let alone the most difficult task: obtaining jobs, internships or starting a career.

You should be encouraging your children as they attend high school, or especially college, to begin obtaining jobs or internships in areas that their degree is focused on. Why, you may ask? Unless you intend to always handout the opportunities to your children, and never force them to do things on their own then you are perpetuating a society of entitlement.

College kids these days do not have resumés mainly because they are not being taught the importance of work or of having a CV. Moreover, they are assuming that once they get the piece of paper to hang on their office wall of a job that they do not even have yet, that there will be people just lined up to hire them.

Take this simple advice: Tell them to get a job that interests them before it is too late, and keep it unless they find something better or more focused on their degree.

Steven Ellis
Gainesville

Regional events