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Hall commissioners will vote on these 4 things March 28
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The Hall County Government Center, pictured on March 30, 2018, at 2875 Browns Bridge Road. - photo by Nick Bowman

The Hall County Board of Commissioners will vote Thursday, March 28, on new rules for vacation rentals, a small subdivision on Clarks Bridge Road, the rezoning of a former Mincey Marble plant and the award of a bid for a South Hall roundabout. The board also will discuss changing regulations for planned residential developments.

Hall County Board of Commissioners

When: 6 p.m. Thursday, March 28

Where: Hall County Government Center, 2875 Browns Bridge Road, Gainesville

Short-term rentals

Commissioners are considering new rules for vacation rentals, but there will be no public hearing.

The vote was originally scheduled for March 14, but commissioners decided to table their decision to have more time to consider the proposal. Three public hearings have been held, one at a Hall County Planning Commission meeting and two at commissioners’ meetings.

Public opinions have been mixed, with some saying they have had negative experiences living near short-term rentals and others saying that responsibly operated vacation rentals should not be a nuisance and can drive tourism.

The proposed changes would allow all homes zoned Residential-I or Residential-II to be short-term rentals, with planning commission approval. Under the current ordinance, which was passed in March 2018, homes zoned Residential-II, which are in higher-density areas, are not eligible to be short-term rentals. Homes zoned Residential-I can only be vacation rentals if they are within 500 feet of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ line for Lake Lanier and are in a subdivision with 10 or fewer homes.

Former Mincey Marble plant up for rezoning

A former West Hall marble plant could be torn down as part of a proposed rezoning.

The property, now owned by Michael Massey, is on Hidden Hills Drive south of Browns Bridge Road. It would be rezoned from planned industrial development to agricultural-residential. Massey has previously told The Times he hopes to remove the former Mincey Marble building and return the property to a pasture.

“We’re going to put it back the way it used to be,” Massey told the planning commission on March 4.

Mincey has moved all production to New Harvest Road, off of Calvary Church Road.

The planning commission recommended approval of the rezoning on March 4.

Clarks Bridge Road subdivision

A 6-lot subdivision on Clarks Bridge Road near Bogus Road is also up for a vote. The 24-acre subdivision was approved by the planning commission on March 4.

Gainesville businessman Jim Walters’ company, Walters Income Properties, would put five homes off Clarks Bridge and Bogus roads. A sixth home would be off Bogus Road and Mission Drive.

At a March 4 public meeting, no community members spoke in favor of or against the request.

Roundabout at Martin and JM Turk roads

Commissioners will vote Thursday to award a roundabout project at JM Turk and Martin Roads in South Hall to Snellville-based E.R. Snell for $875,217.60.

The county received a $640,000 state grant for the project. Zach Propes, the county’s financial services director, said some of that has been spent on engineering for the project.

Commissioners will vote Thursday to increase the budget for the project from $800,000 to $990,847. Propes said that increase reflects expenses the county has had to pay for engineering and legal fees for right of way acquisition.

About $301,000 in Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax funds would be used to fund the remainder of the project. That 1 percent sales tax was approved by voters in 2015.

Planned residential development changes

Commissioners will also hold a reading and public hearing on proposed changes to regulations for planned residential developments.

A second hearing and vote is scheduled for April 11.

A zoning of planned residential development allows for mixed types of housing, such as both single-family homes and apartments.

The proposed changes add some minimum lot sizes and regulations for setbacks, which require buildings to be a certain distance from property lines. For single-family homes, lots would need to be at least 60 feet wide, with front yard setbacks of at least 25 feet, side yard setbacks of at least 5 feet and rear yard setbacks of at least 20 feet. For duplexes, lots would still need to be 60 feet wide, but with front yard setbacks of at least 35 feet, side yard setbacks of at least 10 feet, rear yard setbacks of at least 20 feet.

Developments with at least 100 lots would need two entrances, while developments with at least 300 lots would need three entrances.

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