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Braselton doctor given 33-month prison sentence for illegally prescribing opioids, amphetamines
Opioids

A Braselton doctor was sentenced June 13 to 33 months in federal prison for writing opioid and amphetamine prescriptions to non-patients, according to court officials.

Dr. Johnny Di Blasi, 46, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to unlawfully dispense controlled substances in the U.S. Southern District of Georgia.

“Unscrupulous, profiteering medical professionals not only abuse their trust as health care providers, but feed the illicit pipeline of drugs that fuel the opioid crisis in our communities,” said Southern District of Georgia U.S. Attorney Bobby L. Christine in a statement. “As the arrest and prosecution of Di Blasi demonstrates, we and our law enforcement partners will be relentless in removing dangerous drug distributors from our neighborhoods, whether they are street-corner dealers or professionals who disgrace their lab coats.”

The U.S. Attorney’s Office said Di Blasi, who operated clinics in Pooler and Braselton, was arrested Christmas Eve at Miami International Airport “as he waited to board a flight to Medellin, Colombia, in an attempt to flee prosecution.”

“As described in court filings and in court proceedings, Di Blasi, known as ‘Dr. Johnny,’ admitted writing prescriptions for narcotics, including opioids and amphetamines, to non-patients – many of whom he never met,” according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office.

People from at least 11 states traveled to get prescriptions written by Di Blasi for at least a year, and the investigation began in March 2018, according to court officials. In March 2019, he surrendered his license to practice medicine in Georgia.

“In addition, Di Blasi also provided and sold prescriptions for opioid pain medications and amphetamines to non-patients he met in restaurants and bars. One of those receiving prescriptions was an individual who was in prison at the time the prescription was written,” according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office.

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