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Sunsets on Earth speak to artist Dawn Columbo
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“Earth and Atmosphere: Reconciliation” is an acrylic painting by Dawn Columbo. Eleven of her paintings will be on

‘Earth and Atmosphere’ exhibit
When: August to September
Where: Inman Perk, 102 Washington St., Gainesville
Cost: Free

North Hall resident Dawn Columbo has been an artist all her life.

Whether it has been taking classes or teaching them, the 51-year-old has always been a part of the art community. Now she is set to debut her first solo exhibit.

“(Solo exhibits) are a great thing for artists because we’re able to show our exhibit, our own voice and our own ideas,” Columbo said.

Her most recent exhibit titled “Earth and Atmosphere” references varied exchanges between earth and sky that relate to human emotions.

“I’m dealing with visuals of nature,” Columbo said. “In that, it’s referencing psychology and the human condition and relationships.”

When it comes to the artwork at her show, the lifelong artist said the story it tells depends on those who view it.

“I don’t portray artwork that’s all spelled out for the viewers,” she said. “I like the viewers to take their own experiences and look at the artwork and make their own story.”

Her art will be on display from August to September at Inman Perk, 102 Washington St. NW, in Gainesville. The show will feature 11 of her paintings.

The inspiration Columbo receives for her artwork comes mostly from ordinary, everyday observations.

“Whether it’s a photograph or maybe a sunset or something that catches my eye,” she said. “I do use my imagination with it, so I make it my own.”

Painting is Columbo’s medium of choice, but she enjoys paper mache.

“A lot of people think about paper mache as elementary school experiences,” she said. “I take it to a different level. I try to make my sculptures look like they’re metal or ceramic.”

Columbo earned her art degree in 2010 from Gainesville State College and has taken studio courses from various artists with different mediums.

For the past three years, Columbo has been teaching art at assisted living facilities and rehabilitation centers.

“I teach some art for healing, but I can’t call myself an art therapist,” she said.

But she is an artist with works for sale at Awakening Fine Art, 94 Public Square N., in Dahlonega.

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