By allowing ads to appear on this site, you support the local businesses who, in turn, support great journalism.
Brenau photo exhibit delves into history of medical research
anatomical exhibit06 web
An exhibit of photographs by historian Joanna Ebenstein depicting artifacts from medical museums around the world opens tonight in the Castelli Gallery of the John S. Burd Center for the Performing Arts at Brenau University.

If you’re a fan of TV medical or detective shows, a new exhibit of Brenau University may pique your interest for the inner workings of the human body.

An exhibit of photographs by historian Joanna Ebenstein depicting artifacts from medical museums around the world opens tonight (Feb. 21), with an opening reception set for 5:30-7:30 p.m. in the Castelli Gallery of the John S. Burd Center for the Performing Arts.

“Anatomical Theatre: Depictions of the Body Disease and Death in Medical Museums of the Western World,” includes various images of artifacts, including wax models, skeletal and human remains, that were used to teach medical and surgical students when use of cadavers was both expensive or illegal.

Dr. Jack Nemecek, public health adviser with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, will present a lecture at the reception about medical advances that improved the way diseases are diagnosed, treated and prevented, specifically though immunizations. His talk also looks into the ancient world of medical research captured in the exhibit’s images.

“This body of work is fascinating,” said Melissa Morgan, Brenau University Galleries director. “The imagery, combined with Dr. Nemecek’s lecture, makes for a truly unique experience.”

“The objects on display here have a great deal more to teach us than simply how the lymph node system functions or how to diagnose syphilis,” Ebenstein said. “They function also as cultural and historical artifacts, revealing the world-views of their eras and cultures, such as notions of gender, race and class, shifting ideas about the ideal body versus the aberration, and the ways in which scientific objects should be presented.”

The show and reception are free and open to the public. For information call 770-534-6263.

Regional events