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Council votes on $500,000 Limestone Parkway townhomes
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Optum Development wants to build townhomes near Limestone Parkway.

Update, Oct. 5: A contentious 36-townhome development on Limestone Parkway was approved with conditions.

Optum Development was seeking to annex and rezone 7.8 acres at 1744 Cleveland Hwy from vacation cottage and residential use to planned unit development. The three-story townhome units will vary in size between 2,241 and 2,549 square feet and include two-car garages. They are expected to cost upwards of $500,000 each. 

Amenities at the site will include a pool, clubhouse and walking trails, according to a Gainesville planning report. The project will be accessed from the four-lane Limestone Parkway, a main traffic artery connecting Cleveland Highway to Jesse Jewell Parkway.



A contentious 36-townhome development on Limestone Parkway will have to wait on a final decision after nearby residents asked for the project to prevent rentals, reduce its number of units and keep out of view of neighbors. 


Gainesville City Council voted Tuesday, Sept. 21, to table the application until its next meeting on Oct. 5. 

Optum Development is seeking to annex and rezone 7.8 acres at 1744 Cleveland Hwy from vacation cottage and residential use to planned unit development. The three-story townhome units will vary in size between 2,241 and 2,549 square feet and include two-car garages. They are expected to cost upwards of $500,000 each. 

Amenities at the site would include a pool, clubhouse and walking trails, according to a Gainesville planning report. The project will be accessed from the four-lane Limestone Parkway, a main traffic artery connecting Cleveland Highway to Jesse Jewell Parkway.

Josh Scoggins of Miles Hansford and Tallant, LLC, representing residents during the public hearing, said they wanted conditions added to keep the project at a lower density, make only 10% of units allowed to rent long term and to keep exteriors more consistent with the surrounding area.

Two other residents also spoke in opposition, voicing concerns about the project’s visibility from nearby homes. Developer Ed Maxwell said the project wouldn’t be easily visible with a significant tree buffer maintained.

“We’re trying to do everything we can to protect (neighbors’) green buffers around their homes,” Maxwell said.

Community and Economic Development Deputy Director Matt Tate said the development was consistent with the city’s Limestone corridor requirements in terms of density. 

The project also requires high retaining walls because of the topography of the land, and residents said the walls could be an eyesore. Maxwell said they did not yet know the exact height of the walls. 

Developers wanted the ability to rent some townhomes long term, though Maxwell said they would not allow any short-term rentals (under 30 days) within the development. 

Ward 1 Councilman Sam Couvillon said the applicant needed more time to answer concerns from residents. The council voted unanimously, with Councilman George Wangemann absent, to table the application until its meeting on Oct. 5. 

After the meeting, Scoggins said he felt council members addressed most of the residents’ concerns. “We’d like to get more information on all of these issues,” Scoggins said. 


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