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Apartment complex near Gainesville’s Midland Greenway passes hurdle
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Update, Aug. 3: The Gainesville City Council unanimously voted to approve rezoning for apartment buildings that would tie in to Gainesville’s Midland Greenway, a series of pedestrian and bicycle paths.

The apartments are planned as studio, one- and two-bedroom units ranging from 638 to 1,165 square feet in size, according to the documents. The average cost of a studio would be about $1,300, said William Norris, representing McNeal, with one-bedroom units around $1,500 to $1,600 and two bedrooms around $1,800 per month.

“You’re going to give local businesses more opportunity to have employees live here in downtown Gainesville,” Norris said at the meeting.

The city voted to rezone the property from residential, office and institutional, general business and heavy industrial to planned unit development.

The development would be near Solis Gainesville, another apartment development consisting of 220 apartments that’s under construction off Jesse Jewell Parkway.



A proposed 214-unit apartment complex that would tie into Gainesville’s Midland Greenway, a series of pedestrian and bicycle paths, was given initial approval Tuesday, July 13.

The Gainesville Planning and Appeals Board gave its OK to Marietta-based McNeal Development LLC’s proposal for apartments on 5 acres off Banks Street across from the Gainesville Public Safety Complex on Queen City Parkway.

The development, Gainesville Midland, also would be off Queen City Parkway, Gordon Avenue, Park Street and East Avenue, involving 18 parcels, including all of Longstreet Avenue, according to city documents.

Gainesville Midland’s amenities would include a rooftop clubroom, business center, coffee bar, fitness center, resort-style pool, pet spa, bike storage, indoor mail and package storage room and dry cleaning lockers.

The development will include three four- and five-story buildings consisting of studio, one- and two-bedroom units ranging from 638 to 1,165 square feet in size, according to the documents.

Two of the buildings would have partial basement units.

“What brought me to Gainesville was the strong economic growth that you’ve had as a community,” said William Norris of McNeal.

McNeal is seeking to rezone the property from residential, office and institutional, general business and heavy industrial to planned unit development.

The project now goes to Gainesville City Council for a final vote.

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