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Lounge on this new piece of art overlooking Lake Lanier
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Hall County Parks & Leisure teamed up with Vision 2030 to install a new piece of public art at Laurel Park. The piece, which is called Hammock Hollow, is made out of old sail cloths. People can attach their own hammocks to the structure. - photo by Scott Rogers

Hammock Hollow, a new art installation at Laurel Park in Gainesville, offers visitors a creative approach to enjoying Lake Lanier’s views. 

The blue metal zigzag structure overlooks the body of water, giving people the option to lounge in one of the three hammocks crafted from recycled sail cloth or attach their own. 

The project was born from a partnership between Vision 2030 Public Art and Hall County Parks & Leisure. Mike Harboldt, owner of Saint Udio Metal Shop in Athens, designed the piece.  

Becky Ruffner, marketing and public relationship specialist for Hall County Parks & Leisure, said she teamed up with Allyson Everett, Vision 2030 board member, around a year ago to begin planning the installation, which was funded through the 2018 Vision 2030 block pARTy event. 

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Hall County Parks & Leisure teamed up with Vision 2030 to install a new piece of public art at Laurel Park. The piece, which is called Hammock Hollow, is made out of old sail cloths. People can bring their own hammocks and attach it to the structure. - photo by Scott Rogers

Everett brought design options before the parks and leisure department, who helped determine the artwork’s placement in Hall County. 

Wanting to install Hammock Hollow in a space that embodies Lake Lanier, Ruffner said she chose Laurel Park, which is mostly surrounded by water.  The structure sits on the lake’s shoreline in a place where many people already hang their hammocks. 

“One of the whole ideas was to create something not only beautiful, fun and functionable, but something that also represents Lake Lanier and its history of boating and sailing,” Ruffner said.  

She said the geometric wavy look of the art is meant to mimic the waves of Lake Lanier, while the sail cloth hammocks pay homage to its legacy of watersports.  

Hammock Hollow 

What: Public art installation with usable hammocks  

Where: Laurel Park, 3100 Old Cleveland Highway, Gainesville 


Hammock Hollow is Laurel Park’s only piece of public art. Ruffner said several other installations have been made throughout Hall County’s parks including gold bird statues scattered around the greenspaces and bird bike racks. 

“We think public art beautifies the parks and brings something unique,” Ruffner said. “We think it's important for the community in general to have beautiful pieces of art in the park.” 

Elizabeth Higgins, executive director of Vision 2030, said she is in awe of her board members who have helped erect multiple public artworks over the past couple of months including Hammock Hollow, the striking metal Midland sign and vibrant mural in Gainesville’s Midtown Greenway. 

“During the pandemic, they’re just finding ways for people to be safe and enjoy something wonderful,” Higgins said. “It’s amazing.” 

 

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Visitors to Laurel Park may notice a new set of hammocks set up along the walking path. Hall County Parks & Leisure teamed up with Vision 2030 to install the piece, which is called Hammock Hollow, and made out of old sail cloths. People can also attach their own hammocks to the structure. - photo by Scott Rogers
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