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Gregor Turk projects power in art exhibit in Demorest
Opening reception March 2 at Mason-Scharfenstein Museum of Art
0302-GO-GREGOR-TURK
Gregor Turk’s works will be on display through March 31 at the Mason-Scharfenstein Museum of Art in Demorest.

‘Power Projection’

When: Reception and gallery talk 5–7 p.m. March 2; exhibit through March 31

Where: Mason-Scharfenstein Museum of Art, 567 Georgia St., Demorest

Cost: Free

More info: www.gregorturk.com, rbrantley@piedmont.edu or 706-778-8500, ext. 1011

Gregor Turk has long incorporated cartographic imagery and cultural markings into his art, sculpture, photography and mixed media constructions. The Atlanta man continues this practice in his latest project “Power Projection,” considering the context of contemporary political discord.

Lifted from military terminology, Power Projection refers to a nation’s ability to use its political, economic, informational and military prowess to respond to crises, contribute to deterrence and enhance regional stability. “Power Projection” incorporates new, reconfigured and older work.

It will be on view from March 1–31 at the Piedmont College Mason-Scharfenstein Museum of Art in Demorest. A reception and gallery talk will be from 5–7 p.m., Thursday, March 2, at the museum at 567 Georgia St. in Demorest.

Turk’s exhibition has personal significance to the artist and institution. His paternal grandparents met at Piedmont College back in the early 1900s. Turk grew up in Atlanta but spent several summers and the seven years following graduate school in Homer in neighboring Banks County, where his grandparents once lived. 

Turk received a bachelor of arts degree from Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee, and a Masters of Fine Arts from Boston University. Between degrees, he served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Liberia.

Turk currently works in a studio in Blandtown, a historic neighborhood in Atlanta’s Westside. Examples of his public art are permanently installed at the Atlanta and Jacksonville Airports, the Metropolitan Library in Atlanta and other locations. JP Morgan Chase Art Collection in New York, the High Museum in Atlanta and numerous other public and private collections house his work in their permanent collections. Learn more about Turk’s work at: www.gregorturk.com.

For more information, contact Rebecca Brantley at rbrantley@piedmont.edu or 706-778-8500, ext. 1011.

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