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Opinion: Why we need the Electoral College
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The Constitutional Convention, chaired by George Washington, sweated through the summer, without windows opened lest their deliberations became known. A/C and electric fans were 150 years in the future. By August, most of the Constitution was done except for one important part: presidential elections. Remember, only 13 states, all on the East Coast, existed at that time. The delegates knew if presidential elections were to be by majority vote, states with the most voting citizens would control presidential elections and they felt, since every state was part of the union, all the states should have a voice in the electing of the president.

Finally, toward the end of August, they reached a decision, which we know as “the Electoral College.” This is explained in Article II, Section 1 of our Constitution. Briefly, the Electoral College gives each state a voice in the election of our president. Today, some want to do away with the Electoral College and elect our presidents by popular vote. This would mean states heavily populated could very well control presidential elections from now on, and states such as the Dakotas, Montana, Wyoming, Utah and others would have no voice in electing presidents. The original constitutional delegates carefully avoided using the word “democracy” in our Constitution. The called our nation a “republic.” Remember, we pledge allegiance to our flag “and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under God, with liberty and justice for all.”

Under presidential elections by popular vote, Georgia native Jimmy Carter would have never been our president. I didn’t vote for him, but being a native of Georgia, I am glad Mr. Carter was our president.

George Kaulbach

Cornelia

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