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Rain may bring some relief to drought-stricken area
Temperatures will continue to cool off
1011weather3
A pedestrian walks down the steps in front of the Joint Administration Building during a midday shower Monday. - photo by Tom Reed

Fall is in the air, but better yet, rain is on the parched ground.

A blustery weather system that moved into the area Monday is expected to produce more showers today, possibly dumping 1 inch of rain before it leaves, according to the National Weather Service in Peachtree City.

Showers are expected to taper off Wednesday and Thursday.

Temperatures also will cool off through today, with the high reaching the mid 60s. If you're outdoors, expect an occasional stiff breeze from the northeast.

The rainfall should help bring some relief to the drought-stricken region, particularly as October is typically one of the driest months of the year.

Hall County is in moderate to severe drought, while most of Georgia, including portions of Gwinnett, Barrow and Jackson counties, is suffering from extreme drought, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor.

Water levels continue to drop at Lake Lanier, meanwhile.

The lake stood at 1,061.43 feet above sea level, or nearly 10 feet below full pool of 1,071 feet, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

The last time Lanier was that low was April 7, 2009, or during a two-year drought that ended in October 2009. During that time, the lake fell to a historic low of 1,050.79 feet, set on Dec. 26, 2007.

Lanier is starting to show reminders of that era, as more and more shoreline becomes exposed.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers won't resume issuing boat dock permits "until the elevation of the reservoir is sustained at 1,064 (feet)," Mobile District corps spokeswoman Lisa Coghlan said.

Dry conditions are forecast to return to the area after Thursday.

The National Weather Service is predicting sunny skies through Sunday, with highs reaching the upper 70s.

 

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