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Stop and smell the flora in some of Hall County's best gardens
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Hall County Master Gardener Dianne Bettis works Thursday, May 5, 2022, at the Lovett Literacy Garden on Green Street in Gainesville. hall County Master Gardeners are preparing for their 2022 Garden Walk featuring six gardens. - photo by Scott Rogers
Hall County Master Gardeners 2022 Garden Walk

When: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 21

Where: Six gardens developed and maintained by Hall County Master Gardeners

How much: $15 in advance, $20 day of

Tickets and info: hallcountymggardenwalk.com 

Gardening novices and green-thumbed extraordinaires seeking fresh inspiration have an upcoming opportunity to glean from the masters.

The Hall County Master Gardeners’ biennial garden walk is slated for Saturday, May 21, showcasing the possibilities that exist in one’s own backyard.

The self-guided tour features four private gardens designed and maintained by Hall County Master Gardeners as well as two public garden spaces: the Lovett Literacy Garden on Green Street and a community garden at Cresswind at Lake Lanier.

Details on the private gardens and their locations will be provided upon ticket purchase.

Advance tickets can be secured for $15 on the Hall County Master Gardeners’ website, at the Hall County Schools Central Office and the Hall County Extension Office.

Tickets will be available on the day of the walk for $20 at the Lovett Literacy Garden.

According to Master Gardener and event chairwoman Terri Andrews, each of the gardens are unique by design. The route, which attendees can amble at their own leisure and intrigue, boasts wildlife and foliage, hillside gardening, native and non-native plants including shade plants, vegetables and bonsai, as well as a newer garden developed within the last three years to show emerging gardeners what can be done with a “blank canvas.”

“It would help someone who, say, just moved into a new home; it might be blank and they can figure out what to do from the start,” Andrews said.

According to Andrews, docents will be at each garden site to answer questions and guide guests through the array of botanicals. QR codes posted throughout the gardens will take smartphone users straight to overall garden information as well as details about specific plants, their origins and environmental needs.

“We want to educate people on all the aspects of gardening, and we show them six different ways to do that,” Andrews said. “We try to have something that you can identify with as an average person, that you can walk through and say, ‘I have a house like this, you mean I could do this?’ The most memorable thing (about the garden walks) is seeing people come into one of our gardens and seeing this look of awe and happiness. People are not only impressed but in awe of what people can do in their own backyards.”

Aside from additional knowledge and inspiration, garden walkers will go home with a free pass-along plant selected by the Master Gardeners.

The garden walk will take place rain or shine, Andrews said. Guests can visit one garden or all six in whichever sequence they choose.

Housed by the UGA-Hall County Extension, the Master Gardeners program exists to help teach the public about gardening via classes and mentoring, Andrews said. 

“You may go to some of these gardens and think, ‘Wow, I would love to have that in my backyard, I’d love to go out and enjoy a garden like this,’” Andrews said. “We’d be able to help you do that by education.” 

For more information on the Hall County Master Gardeners and upcoming garden walk, visit hallmastergardeners.com