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You’ll have to hurry to beat fall and catch Hall’s figs
Fig season runs from July to early September
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New and ripe figs hang from a tree at Snare Farm on Sept. 5. Fig season in Hall County is quickly coming to a close, but U-pick is still open at the Gillsville Highway farm. - photo by Nick Bowman

Figs are fading fast on the farms of Hall County as the region nears the end of the season, but a few of those seedy suckers can still be found around the area.

On Snare Farm at 3736 Gillsville Highway, the brother and sister owners Donald Snare and Joanne LaCourse are raising brown turkey figs, a delicious fruit with a funny name.

They’re third-generation owners of the little patch of land along the highway, from which they and their predecessors have harvested muscadines, pears, apples, asparagus, corn and, especially, brown turkey figs for decades.


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Joanne LaCourse stands beneath muscadine vines on Sept. 5 at Snare Farm, which also has more than 50 fig trees that produce fruit from July to early September. - photo by Nick Bowman

Brown turkey figs grow so well they basically burst out of the ground in North Georgia, LaCourse said, and she recommends anybody try planting one of the trees in their backyard if they have the space and the time for some annual pruning.

Snare Farm has been a U-pick operation since the 1980s, LaCourse said on Tuesday. The farmers ask that customers bring their own buckets to transport their fruit home. A gallon of picking costs $12.

But you’ll have to act fast if you want to catch any turkeys. The season started in July and ends in September; as the days and nights get cooler, figs will stop sprouting and ripening, LaCourse said.

If Hall County gets some heat for the next week or so, you should still be able to take home some figs.

Sitting about 15 minutes east of Gainesville, the farm is a quick trip and offers you and your family a chance to get out for some quiet picking — there’s no line and no elbows to bump among the figs, muscadines and scuppernongs available for picking.

It has no website and no social media presence, which LaCourse said is how they like it. If no one is there to greet you when you arrive, a phone number is posted at the entrance.

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