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It came with little warning. Residents awoke on the morning of Monday, April 6, 1936 to a dark, ominous sky, perfectly still air and a sense that something was about to happen. At 8:27 a.m., three tornadoes descended on Gainesville, ripping apart the downtown area. When it was over, more than 200 were dead and thousands injured. It remains the deadliest tornado in Georgia history and the fifth deadliest in the U.S. The Times and gainesvilletimes.com remember that day 75 years ago with special coverage.

A view up Main Street toward the square.
Expanded interview with historian Steve Gurr
Ed Parks: He was injured when his home collapsed around him.

Anne Chenault: Her parents met and fell in love in the storm’s aftermath.

Virginia Parks Souther: She shared her memories from the storm with her grandson, Mark Souther, in 1989.

CLICK TO VIEW IMAGES | Photos from the Hall County Historical Photo Collection of the Hall County Library and Atlanta Journal-Constitution Photographic Archives at Georgia State University Special Collections & Archives

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GAINESVILLE EAGLE: April 9, 1936 | April 16, 1936 [Sec. 1] | April 16, 1936 [Sec. 3] | March 24, 1938
GAINESVILLE NEWS: April 8, 1936
ATLANTA JOURNAL: April 7, 1936 | April 8, 1936
THOMASVILLE TIMES-ENTERPRISE: April 6, 1936

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