View Mobile Site

Archive By Section - Johnny Vardeman's column


19th century teacher had tough words for parents

Educators sometimes are frustrated that parents don't get more involved in their children's education. But their problems today hardly compare to the late 1800s when children were expected to pull their weight on the family farm.

June 28, 2009 | Johnny Vardeman | Johnny Vardeman's column


Lulans are proud of their veterans from past wars

For Lula being no bigger than it is, the east Hall County town has supplied its country with more than its share of military heroes.

June 21, 2009 | Johnny Vardeman | Johnny Vardeman's column


Mayflower Café started tasty career

If you lived in Hall County or nearby in the 1950s, more than likely you had a meal at the Mayflower Café.

June 14, 2009 | Johnny Vardeman | Johnny Vardeman's column


Letters home shed light on World War I

Communication from overseas to back home was painstakingly slow during World War I, and it mostly consisted of letters from soldiers to their parents, other relatives or friends.

June 07, 2009 | Johnny Vardeman | Johnny Vardeman's column


How it was on the homefront during World War I

Plenty of veterans of World War II remain and even more people who remember the war.

May 31, 2009 | Johnny Vardeman | Johnny Vardeman's column


Bryan wowed large crowd in Gainesville

William Jennings Bryan went down in history as one of the country's greatest orators. He is best known for his part in the Scopes trial, which debated the teaching of evolution.

May 24, 2009 | Johnny Vardeman | Johnny Vardeman's column


Blairsville retiree stayed a Boy Scout for a lifetime

John Preston didn't know it at the time, but when his mother, Robbie, gathered his Cub Scout den together in the basement of their Ridgewood Avenue home in Gainesville, it was the start of a lifetime in Scouting for him.

May 17, 2009 | Johnny Vardeman | Johnny Vardeman's column


Deadly flu outbreak in 1918 closed much of Gainesville

When the influenza pandemic roared into North Georgia in the fall of 1918, schools closed and some activities shut down for a few weeks.

May 10, 2009 | Johnny Vardeman | Johnny Vardeman's column


Free bridge travel once was a luxury

As the automobile began to show up more around the turn of the 20th century, the demand for more roads and bridges increased. They sometimes became embroiled in controversy.

May 03, 2009 | Johnny Vardeman | Johnny Vardeman's column


Hall, South begged for a ‘bale-out’ before World War I

Federal "bailouts" of financial institutions, carmakers or others generate considerable heat across the country, but especially in the South.

April 26, 2009 | Johnny Vardeman | Johnny Vardeman's column


Congressman helped find his father's killer

Tom Bell was a man of action who served as 9th District U.S. Representative from 1905 to 1931.

April 19, 2009 | Johnny Vardeman | Johnny Vardeman's column


And you say politics today can get nasty

We think partisan politics is worse than ever, but it's pretty tame compared to some periods of the country's history.

One incident involving a Hall Countian not long after the Civil War is an example of how things sometimes could get out of hand between political party supporters.

April 12, 2009 | Johnny Vardeman | Johnny Vardeman's column


Indian raid in 1859 nearly killed Hall native

Green Russell, who with his brothers caused a gold rush in what is now Colorado and who shares credit for the founding of Denver, was a colorful, adventurous character out of the hills of Lumpkin and Dawson counties.

April 05, 2009 | Johnny Vardeman | Johnny Vardeman's column


Leather wasn’t only product of Bona Allen tannery

Buford has a long history of sports excellence; witness the recent girls high school state basketball championship or the almost routine state championship football teams.

March 29, 2009 | Johnny Vardeman | Johnny Vardeman's column


Bona Allen leather works long gone, but name persists

The Bona Allen leather enterprises have been long gone from Buford, but the Bona Allen name lives and forever will be identified with the Gwinnett and Hall counties town of Buford.

March 22, 2009 | Johnny Vardeman | Johnny Vardeman's column


« First  « Prev  17 18 19 20 21  Next »  Last »

Page 19 of 25

Articles by Section - Johnny Vardeman's column


Late Gov. Carl Sanders kept substantial ties to Hall

Carl Sanders, the Georgia governor from 1963-67, who died last week, had a lot of Gainesville connections.

November 23, 2014 | Johnny Vardeman | Johnny Vardeman's column


Vintage Gainesville photos stir memories, show changes

Nothing funner on a rainy day than pulling out family photo albums, reminiscing and laughing over how you, your children, grandchildren and others have changed through the years.

November 16, 2014 | Johnny Vardeman | Johnny Vardeman's column


Veterans Day honors military heroes of all conflicts

Tuesday is Veterans Day, when at the 11th hour on the 11th day of November, the 11th month, citizens and veterans across the country honor and remember veterans of all wars.

November 09, 2014 | Johnny Vardeman | Johnny Vardeman's column


How survivor escaped flames in pants plant

The Cooper Pants Factory historical marker at the corner of Maple and Broad streets in Gainesville has been appropriately unveiled in remembrance of those who died in the 1936 tornado, specifically those killed in the tragic fire that engulfed the pants factory.

November 02, 2014 | Johnny Vardeman | Johnny Vardeman's column


Original copy of Gainesville High paper dates to 1902

Gainesville High School students and alumni are familiar with The Trumpeter, the school newspaper for decades.

October 26, 2014 | Johnny Vardeman | Johnny Vardeman's column


How much do you know about Lake Lanier, local history?

Time for another little local history trivia quiz. Answers follow:

October 19, 2014 | Johnny Vardeman | Johnny Vardeman's column


Timely rains kept schedule for filling lake

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and local leaders broke ground for Buford Dam in 1949, and it would be another seven years before the first trickle of water from the Chattahoochee River would begin to form Lake Lanier.

October 12, 2014 | Johnny Vardeman | Johnny Vardeman's column


Cooper Pants Factory marker finally to honor victims of '36 tragedy

A mother and her two daughters were among those killed in the Cooper Pants Factory fire that started during the 1936 Gainesville tornado.

October 05, 2014 | Johnny Vardeman | Johnny Vardeman's column


1

Page 1 of 1


Contents of this site are © Copyright 2014 The Times, Gainesville, GA. All rights reserved. Privacy policy and Terms of service

Powered by
Morris Technology
Please wait ...