View Mobile Site

Your Views: Government shutdown is a small price to halt runaway spending

POSTED: October 10, 2013 1:00 a.m.

I was walking through the mall and I realized something: I no longer notice the overweight and obese people, but I notice those who are slim. They are the exception now rather than the rule. Over indulgence and obesity have become commonplace and accepted.

Once upon a time, gluttony was considered one of the seven deadly sins. Now, few people are self-disciplined enough to control themselves, even if it means they can live a healthier life.

This same deterioration in values and discipline is reflected in our society and government. We no longer have the will to live within our means. The temporary shutdown of some government functions is viewed as irresponsible. The truth, however, is the only responsible thing our representatives can do is to force the administration and Senate to accept the fact that uncontrolled spending must stop.

Somehow we have become drugged by credit card economics. We believe that as long as we pay the interest, we don’t have to worry about the debt. But what does that do to our children and grandchildren? If you do this in your personal life, your heirs will be burdened with your selfish debt. The same is true of government.

The tea party, which has been demonized by both the media and the president, are simply asking for a return to constitutional government and fiscal responsibility. Those representatives who support tea party principles are labeled fanatics because they seek to represent the ideals of their constituency.

The progressives, on the other hand, are hailed as compassionate when they propose continued irresponsible spending. There is no regard for the true welfare of the country, only the desire to buy votes so that they can continue their gluttonous policies.

There will be no restoration of our country or economy without pain. The temporary loss of services is a small price to pay if it will result in the left-leaning Senate and administration reducing spending and working toward not only the elimination of the deficit, but also the paying off of debt.

Thomas Day
Buford


Contents of this site are © Copyright 2010 The Times, Gainesville, GA. All rights reserved. Privacy policy and Terms of service

Powered by
Morris Technology
Please wait ...