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Fruit and Chocolate Scones and Fruit Bismark

POSTED: April 20, 2011 1:30 a.m.

Fruit and Chocolate Scones

Classic to afternoon teas, scones are commonly baked plain or studded with currants, then accompanied with jam and clotted cream, a thick, creamy spread. You can make your version with any dried fruit, such as blueberries, cranberries or apricots. You also can add chopped nuts or chocolate chips.

Start to finish: 1 hour

Servings: 8

2 3/4 cups all-purpose flour

1/3 cup sugar

4 teaspoons baking powder

1/4 teaspoon salt

10 tablespoons butter, melted

1 cup heavy cream

1/4 cup sour cream

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 1/2 cups dried fruit, nuts and/or chocolate bits

Coarse sugar, optional

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Add the melted butter and stir until well distributed. Add the cream, sour cream and vanilla. Mix until almost combined, then add the fruit and nuts and mix just until distributed.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Pat the dough into a circle about 3/4 inch thick and 10 inches across. Cut the circle into 8 wedges, then transfer each wedge to the prepared baking sheet. Refrigerate or freeze until well chilled, 15 to 30 minutes.

While the scones chill, heat the oven to 400 F. Sprinkle the tops of the scones with coarse sugar, if desired. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes. Cool before serving.

Nutrition information per serving (values are rounded to the nearest whole number): 602 calories; 323 calories from fat (54 percent of total calories); 36 g fat (19 g saturated; 1 g trans fats); 84 mg cholesterol; 70 g carbohydrate; 9 g protein; 3 g fiber; 947 mg sodium.

(Recipe by Alison Ladman)

Fruit Bismarcks

Bismarcks also are known as Dutch babies and German pancakes. Though this oven pancake isn’t commonly served as a breakfast item in England, its savory counterpart, known as a Yorkshire pudding, is served for Sunday dinner with leftovers being served with jam for dessert. Use any fruit you like for the filling; fresh berries are particularly good, but sauteed apples with cinnamon and sugar are tasty as well.

Start to finish: 35 minutes

Servings: 8

1 cup milk

4 eggs

1 cup bread flour, sifted

1/2 teaspoon baking powder

Pinch salt

4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) butter

1 1/2 cups fresh fruit, such as sliced peaches, citrus segments or berries

Powdered sugar or whipped cream, to garnish, if desired

Heat the oven to 450 F.

In a medium bowl, whisk together the milk, eggs, flour, baking powder and salt until smooth.

Place the butter in a pie plate or oven-safe skillet. Set the pie plate or skillet in the oven. When the butter has melted, swirl the pan around to fully coat the bottom and sides. Pour the batter into the hot pan and immediately return to the oven. Bake for 15 minutes, then lower the temperature to 375 F and continue to cook until browned and puffy, about another 10 minutes.

Remove the pan from the oven. Heap the fruit in the center, then serve dusted with powdered sugar or topped with whipped cream, if desired.

Nutrition information per serving (values are rounded to the nearest whole number): 174 calories; 78 calories from fat (45 percent of total calories); 9 g fat (5 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 125 mg cholesterol; 17 g carbohydrate; 7 g protein; 2 g fiber; 115 mg sodium.

(Recipe by Alison Ladman)



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