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Royal Rose Bakery bring French fare to Gainesville

Owner forks out traditional tastes at farmers markets

POSTED: June 25, 2014 1:00 a.m.

Myriam Shuler is bringing a taste of France to Gainesville with signature recipes straight from Nice to local farmers markets.

Shuler owns Royal Rose Bakery, a company specializing in French baked goods such as quiches and Provence cookies. Shuler sets up shop each weekend at a local farmers market to bring her dishes directly to the public.

“I try to accommodate tastes with something that will appeal to the American public without discarding southern French flavors,” Shuler said of her dishes.

The French-born woman has traditional provence cookies like lavender and anis seed, but she also created a chocolate chip version with a more American flavor.

Shuler grew up in Nice, France, and came to the United States about 14 years ago to earn a business degree from then-Gainesville State College and the University of Georgia. After working in international business development for the French Embassy for six years, she decided to turn her love of baking into a business.

“I always baked in my hometown, and cooking was always a pleasure when I could share my hometown dishes with friends and colleagues,” Shuler said, smiling.

Her unique tastes, like the lavender cookies, intrigued her American friends. They were always willing to try the traditional flavors.

“They are my mother’s recipes,” Shuler said. “Everyone thought the lavender was really interesting and wanted to try it.”

Although her recipes are traditional, they are local in a way as well. Shuler spent months remodeling the recipes so she could use local ingredients instead of importing them from France.

“Sometimes it’s hard to adapt the recipe,” she said. “It took lots of hours to figure out the right baguette with local ingredients. It has to come out right or I’m not making it.”

Shuler also adapts her cake recipes to the season. This Friday at the Historic Downtown Gainesville Market On The Square, she will feature a raspberry-lemon cake and a blueberry-white chocolate version made with locally grown fruits for summer.

She also sells her provence cookies at Green’s Grocery and is focused on wholesaling her products.

“At first I was not interested in the markets,” Shuler said. “I was mainly focusing on online and wholesale. But what interested me was that I’m a people person, and the market is close to me. I love the people at the market. We are really close together here.”

Ed Waller, Green’s Grocery owner, explained many market vendors search for local places to sell during the week. Therefore, he accommodates some requests.

“We usually say go ahead and put them on the shelves,” Waller said. “All we can do is try for them.”

Shuler doesn’t have to try very hard. Her cookies area a hit.

“Regulars come to buy the cookies since the (farmers) market isn’t every single day and they want to get their hands on them,” Waller said. “I’m out right now!”

Shuler plans to try selling her fresh baguettes at the store come winter.

She noted that farmers markets in the United States are not like those in France. But she still enjoys them because “nothing can take away the feeling of direct compliments from customers.”

In addition to Shuler and the many other vendors at the market, Friday’s event will feature music from Aaron Richard and will be a part of Georgia Farmers Market Week, as proclaimed by Gov. Nathan Deal. Commissioner of Agriculture Gary Black will also be in attendance.

“The commissioner has picked a market a day to go to,” Gainesville farmers market coordinator Steve Thomas said. “We are extremely honored that he has chosen to attend the Gainesville market on Friday.”

Georgia Farmers Market Week will conclude with the Georgia Grown Farmers Showcase at the Atlanta State Farmers Market on Saturday.


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